Category Archives: Conferences

CFP: Transatlantic Women 3 – Women of the Green Atlantic (Deadline 11.01.2017)

Transatlantic Women 3: Women of the Green Atlantic

Dublin, Ireland Royal Irish Academy

21-22 June 2018


Sponsored by the Catherine Maria Sedgwick Society and the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society

“Since every wind that blows brings to our shores a fresh swarm of these people, who are to form so potent an element in our future national character, it behooves us to study them well, and make the best we can of  them.”

Catharine  Sedgwick,  “The  Little  Mendicants” (1846)
The third meeting of Transatlantic Women will take place in Dublin, Ireland, on 21-22 June 2018 at the Royal Irish Academy. It will focus on Irish/American crosscurrents of the long nineteenth century, on the transatlantic stream of writers, reformers, and immigrants crossing over the Green Atlantic who were engaged in refuting but also perpetuating stereotypes and racist beliefs that troubled Irish-American relations. Such authors as Catharine Sedgwick, for instance, wrestled with contradictory conceptions created of Irish immigrants who appear in many of her writings, including “Irish  Girl”  (1842) and  “The  Post  Office:  An  Irish  Story”  (1843). In a different context, “An  Affectionate  and  Christian  Address  of  Many  Thousands  of  Women”   (1852) pointedly  addressed  American  women  as  the  “sisters”  of  women  from  both  Great  Britain   and Ireland; although Harriet Beecher Stowe never traveled to Ireland, she met deputations from that country during her first visit to Europe (1853). In  “What  Is  a  Home?”  (1864)  and  “Servants”   (1865), she expressed concerns about the Irish in the United States similar to those of Sedgwick.

This transatlantic gathering will celebrate, and question, nineteenth-century women who crossed the Green Atlantic, wrote about it, or in other ways connected the United States with Ireland through networks, translations, transatlantic fame, or influence. As Peter  D.  O’Neill  and   David Lloyd demonstrate in The Black and Green Atlantic: Cross-Currents of the African and Irish Diasporas (2009), people from Ireland, as well as from Africa and the United States, crossed the Atlantic as slaves and servants, as cultural and political exiles or activists. Many women, active in travel writing, pamphleteering, writing fiction, newspaper articles, speeches, fairy tales, and ghost stories, were  promoters  of  women’s  rights  and  the  figure  of  the New Woman, and were engaged in philanthropy, temperance, abolitionism, social commentary—and simply just in sightseeing and enjoying themselves. Among the most prominent figures to build bridges between the United States and Ireland around activism are such well-known Americans as Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony (on the Irish Question), Frances Willard, Ellen Craft, Ida B. Wells, and the Irish Frances Power Cobbe; among those who have received less attention are, for example, the African American Sarah Parker Remond and the poet Frances Osgood. And the exchange went both ways: fiction by Irish writer Maria Edgeworth, for instance, influenced Sedgwick, among others.

The Transatlantic Women 3 conference brings together scholars representing various countries and disciplines to examine the ways in which these women and their ideas moved, how they resisted oppression and created new ways to conceptualize their identities and the reality surrounding them. We welcome presentations on any topic related to nineteenth-century transatlantic women but are especially interested in those dealing with women of the Irish- American nexus. Some of the key concepts include race, stereotypes, assimilation, immigrant reality; conceptualization of space, distance, and identity; movement, and memory—historical and personal.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • recovering voices of Irish-Americans, or American-Irish women
  • struggles of immigrant women
  • women pioneers, in professions, activism, innovation
  • female networks and sisterhoods—of writers, journalists, travelers
  • women activists (abolitionism, anti-lynching,  temperance,  women’s  rights,  peace,  white

    slavery, reform, animal rights)

  • women travelers and their descriptive gaze
  • fictional and realistic descriptions of places, people, and societies
  • women’s  articulations  of  transatlanticism and the Green Atlantic

    Abstracts, which should be about 250 words, and a short bio, are due by 1 November 2017. They should be emailed to transatlanticwomen3@gmail.com.

    We look forward to yet another stimulating transatlantic conversation with you!

    Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact any of the organizers:
    Beth L. Lueck (lueckb@uww.edu), Sirpa Salenius (sirpa.salenius@uef.fi), or Lucinda Damon-Bach (ldamonbach@salemstate.edu).

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CFP: Sedgwick Society at ALA 2017 (Deadline: 1.15.17)

As we head toward the 150th anniversary of Catharine Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society in 2017, we invite proposals for the following panel for ALA 2017:

Session #1: TIME, MEMORIALS AND ANNIVERSARIES (3 or 4 15 to 20-minute papers):

How is “time” referenced in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s writings? Does her sense of time seem consistent at moments with Wordsworth’s “spots of time”? Is there more that can be said about her “anachronistic imaginings,” to take a phrase from Jeffrey Insko’s 2004 essay, “Anachronistic Imaginings: Hope Leslie’s Challenge to Historicism?” What about her attention to memory, memorials, and monuments, and how space and visual culture relate to notions of time? What about anniversaries, rituals and annual or seasonal celebrations? This panel invites proposals on these and other issues related to the perception of time, the passage of time, and the celebration of times past in Sedgwick’s writings or the writings of her contemporaries.

I want to remind readers that the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society is holding its 8th symposium in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, June 7-10, 2017, celebrating both the 150th anniversary of Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the CMS Society. The focus for the symposium is “Where and When: Evolving Concepts of Place, Space, and Time in the Writings of Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries.” There is potential to have meaningful overlap between the May ALA panel and the June symposium. The Society asks that participants do not deliver exactly the same paper at both events but encourages work that connects papers between the different forums or initiates an ongoing conversation.

ALA will be held May 25-28, 2017 (Thursday to Sunday of Memorial Day weekend) at Westin Copley Place in Boston, MA.

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2017

Please send abstracts to Lisa West, V.P. for External Conferences, CMS Society: lisa.west@drake.edu

CFP: Sedgwick Society Symposium – June 2017 (Deadline 12.9.16)

Announcing Our 8th Symposium!

“Where and When: Evolving Concepts of Place, Space, and Time

in the Writings of Sedgwick and Her Contemporaries”

Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of Sedgwick’s death in 1867

and The 20th Anniversary of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society

June 7-10, 2017 — The Red Lion Inn, Stockbridge, Massachusetts

From her first novel, A New-England Tale; or Sketches of New-England Character and Manners (1822) to her last, Married or Single? (1857), much of Catharine Sedgwick’s writing, like the writing of many of her contemporaries, is geographically and historically specific. While a significant body of criticism has treated the elements of history and locality in Sedgwick’s works, far less scholarship has explored the ways in which her depictions of settings reflect changing ideas about both place and time over the course of her career. How did Sedgwick’s understanding of her native Berkshires, the larger region of New England, and the nation as a whole evolve as her physical and personal life, her professional career, and the United States advanced and matured? How did her perception of the passage of time, of cultural change, and of history itself evolve as political expansion, economic development, and technological innovation rapidly changed the look, the breadth, and the pace of American life from the 1820s to the Civil War?

Commemorating the 150th anniversary of Sedgwick’s death and the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society, the Society will return to Sedgwick’s home town of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, to convene its 8th symposium from June 7-10, 2017. The Society is thrilled to have as our keynote speaker the renowned scholar Dr. Mary C. Kelley, the Ruth Bordin Collegiate Professor of History, American Culture, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan.  Dr. Kelley has published extensively on Sedgwick and other 19th-century American Women Writers and her works include such notable books as Private Woman, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America and The Power of Her Sympathy: The Autobiography and Journal of Catharine Maria Sedgwick.

The Society invites proposals that consider Sedgwick’s legacy—how it grew over the course of her career and how it has evolved in the century and a half since her death—as well as the work of Sedgwick (or one of her male or female contemporaries with links to Sedgwick) through the lenses of place, space, and time broadly construed—including studies of setting and historicity as well as more contemporary theoretical approaches to time, space, and the environment. Papers might:

  • Explore evolving ways of reading/representing the landscape in works by Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Make connections between new technological developments, such as railroads and telegraphs, and changing perceptions of space and time in literature
  • Explore the state of the union as reflected in evolving depictions of place
  • Discuss the role of historic sites, cemeteries, place names in fiction and in national identity
  • Rethink the “transcendental” movement in terms of space and time
  • Elucidate cultural histories or popular culture representations of iconic New England scenes, such as the Concord Bridge, Ice Glen, Sacrifice Rock/Laurel Hill, Mount Holyoke, or Monument Mountain
  • Envision new roles for Sedgwick’s works in the classroom or interpret ways in which the teaching of Sedgwick and her contemporaries has evolved over nearly fifty years of recovery scholarship
  • Demonstrate ways in which digital humanities and online archives impact scholarly research on Sedgwick and her contemporaries
  • Theorize changing perceptions of domestic life, familial relationships, and the meaning of “home”: how might the “domestic” be reframed in terms of space, place and time?
  • Focus on the material distribution of texts (letters, periodicals, transatlantic republishing) in Sedgwick’s time and how these distribution methods relate to space, place and time
  • Explore ways in which considerations of geographic and/or historic specificity support, reiterate, and/or challenge larger theoretical notions of geography and/or history
  • Elucidate the life cycle or developmental paradigm of nonhuman entities:  plants, landscapes, mountains, art, nations, communities
  • Construct or deconstruct conceptual boundaries and binaries, such as country/city; past/present; colony/metropole; village/nation
  • Demonstrate how places that are geographically distant become connected through narrative
  • Describe ways in which concepts of space, place and/or time are constrained or distorted by gender, race, age, ethnicity or other factors
  • Track a specific place or moment in time across a variety of texts by different writers
  • Examine indirect experiences of geographic places or historic moments through the use of art, storytelling, monuments, news, or other forms of representation

These are among the many possibilities—as usual, all Sedgwick-related topics are welcome!

Please e-mail proposals of approximately 200-400 words by December 9, 2016, to Lisa West, CMSS Second Vice-President for Programs:   lisa.west@drake.edu

To register for the symposium or get more information about the conference program or outings in the Stockbridge area, visit the CMSS website at http://cmsedgwicksociety.org

CFP – American Literature Association (Extended Deadline 01.23.16)

American Literature Association Conference – San Francisco (May 26-29, 2016)

The Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society invites proposals for two panels at ALA.

Session #1 (15 to 20-minute papers): “Catharine Sedgwick’s New England”

A New England Tale
(1822) was one of the first of Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s novels to be republished and garner critical attention. Since its recovery, there has been increased interest in other early American women writers, such as Hannah Foster, Susannah Rowson, and Lydia Maria Child. There also has been a surge of interest in the American novel written before 1820. This panel seeks scholarship on “Catharine Sedgwick’s New England” that situates the work of Sedgwick and other American women writers in the increasingly global public sphere of the early nineteenth century. Papers might address (but certainly aren’t limited to) the transatlantic genre of the “village sketch”; New England religion in the context of the Second Great Awakening and global encounters with non-Christian peoples (particularly relevant in the current political climate); Sedgwick and the rise of the early American novel and/or the rise of the American short story; women writers in public; writing about New England as a response to (or retreat from) the responsibilities of nationhood; relationships between early American authors and their European friends/family/publishers/correspondents.

Session #2:   “Teaching Catharine Maria Sedgwick” (roundtable–10-min talks/presentations)


With the recent republication of Clarence and Married or Single?, and the growing online inventory at “Sedgwick Stories: The Periodical Writings of Catharine Maria Sedgwick,” more Sedgwick texts are available for the classroom. The ongoing “Just Read/Teach One Sedgwick Story” challenge invites even wider readership. This panel will focus on reading/teaching Catharine Maria Sedgwick at all levels.  Papers do not need to focus on the newest editions. Instead we welcome all papers addressing teaching Sedgwick in this new era when more texts are available in print and through the web. Particularly welcome are papers on teaching future teachers, teaching high school students, teaching in alternative classrooms, and foci on other specific student populations.

EXTENDED DEADLINE: January 23, 2016.

Please send abstracts to Lisa West, V.P. for External Conferences, CMS Society: lisa.west@drake.edu

CMSS at SSAWW – Nov. 4-8th, 2015

CMSS at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers

For those attending the SSAWW’s Triennial Conference November 4-8th, 2015 in Philadelphia, please find below a list of Sedgwick-related panels including our Society-sponsored panel and the Sedgwick Tea.

 

Wednesday, November 4th 5:00 – 6:15 pm

Wednesday Special Welcome Roundtable Panel

Syllabus Exchange Roundtable

*Including
Melissa Homestead, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “The Nineteenth-Century American Novel and the Marriage Plot”

Friday, November 6th 8:55 – 10:10 am

Session 7-G FR: To Be or Not to Be (Married) in Catharine Sedgwick’s Fiction (Ballroom D) Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Panel

Chair: Deborah Gussman, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Michelle Gaffner Wood, Cedarville University, “Inhibiting the Liminal: The Architecture of Single Life in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Fiction”

Jordan Von Cannon, Louisiana State University, “Neither Married Nor Single: Sedgwick’s Alternate Paths of Female Development”

Saturday, November 7th 9:30 – 10:50 am
(There are three concurrent panels all with Sedgwick-related presentations)

Session 14-A SA: Issues in Recovery and Editing: A Roundtable with Editors in the Legacies of Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers Book Series (Ballroom C)

*Including
Deborah Gussman, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, “Recovering an Author’s Late Work: Catharine Sedgwick’s Married or Single?

Session 14-E SA: Teaching American Women Writers with Digital Tools, Platforms, and Projects Roundtable (Ballroom B)

*Including                                                                                                                         Christiane Farnan, Siena College, “Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie, and Omeka.net”

Session 14-G SA: Transatlantic Sympathy, Stowe, and Sedgwick (Flower)

*Including
Lucinda Damon-Bach, Salem State University, “‘My Readers Will Thank Me’: Transatlantic Sympathy in Sedgwick’s Letters from Abroad to Kindred at Home

3:10 – 4:30 pm
Session 18-A SA: Literary Tea and Book Celebration (Cook)