Secondary Bibliography

This is an extensive, though not necessarily comprehensive, bibliography of secondary sources on Sedgwick’s life and works. If you know of books or articles that are not on this list but should be, please contact us.

Anderson, Jill Kirsten. Remembering the Ladies: Imagining Equalitarianism in Early American Novels of Manners. Dissertation: Michigan State U, 2006.

Anthony, Jarrett E. Higher Laws: The Making of Religion in Antebellum American Literature. Dissertation: U of Pennsylvania, 2011.

Ashworth, Suzanne. “Invalid Insurrections: Intellect and Appetite in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Biography of Lucretia Maria Davidson.” American Transcendental Quarterly 20.2 (2006): 419-447.

Austin, John. “The Collection as Literary Form: Sedgwick’s Tales and Sketches of 1835.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 158-169.

Avallone, Charlene. “Catharine Sedgwick and the ‘Art’ of Conversation.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 192-208.

—. “Catharine Sedgwick and the Circles of New York.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 23.2 (2006): 115-31.

—. “Catharine Sedgwick’s White Nation-Making: Historical Fiction and The Linwoods.” ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance 55.2 (2009): 97-133.

Bailey, Brigitte. “Tourism and Visual Subjection in Letters from Abroad and ‘An Incident in Rome.'” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 212-229.

Bailey, Jocelyn. Imperiled Bodies: Sentimentality and Illness in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Literature. Dissertation: U of Arkansas, 2015.

Balaam, Peter. “‘Piazza to the North’: Melville Reading Sedgwick.” Melville and Women. Ed. Elizabeth Schultz and Haskell Springer. Kent, OH: Kent State UP, 2006. 60-81.

Banks, Jenifer. “‘From Home to Home’: Sedgwick’s Study of Deviance.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 234-247.

Bauermeister, Erica R. “The Lamplighter, The Wide, Wide World, and Hope Leslie: The Recipes for Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Novels.” Legacy: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers 8, no. 1 (1991): 17-28.

Baumgartner, Barbara Ann. Reading and Writing Bodily Violence in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Writing. Dissertation: Northwestern U, 1998.

Baym, Nina. Woman’s Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-1870. 1978. 2nd. Ed. Urbana: U Ilinois P, 1993.

Beach, Seth Curtis. Daughters of the Puritans: A Group of Brief Biographies. Boston: American Unitarian Association, 1905.

Bell, Michael D. “History and Romance Convention in Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” American Quarterly 22 (1970): 213-21.

Block, Shelley R. and Etta M. Madden. “Science in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 20.1-2 (2003): 22-37.

Brooks, Gladys. Three Wise Virgins. New York: Dutton, 1957.

Buchenau, Barbara. “Wizards of the West? How Americans Respond to Sir Walter Scott, the ‘Wizard of the North.'” James Fenimore Cooper: His Country and His Art 11 (1997): 14-25.

Buchenau, Barbara, Eva Findenegg, and Frank Lauterbach. “Normative Programs and Artistic Liberties: Inter-American Case Studies in Historical Fiction and the Campaigns for Cultural Dissociation.” Internationalität Nationaler Literaturen. Ed. Udo Schöning, Beata Weinhagen, and Frank Seemann. Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2000.

Burleigh, Erica. “Sisters in Arms: Incest, Miscegenation, and Sacrifice in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” New England Quarterly: A Historical Review of New England Life and Letters 86.2 (2013): 196-231.

Cagidemetrio, Alide. “A Plea for Fictional Histories and Old-Time ‘Jewesses.’” The Invention of Ethnicity. Ed. Werner Sollors. New York: Oxford UP, 1989.

Carmichael, Tami Skinner. Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Literary Miscegenation: Transcending Boundaries in 19th Century American Literature. Dissertation: U of Georgia, 1998.

Castiglia, Christopher. “In Praise of Extra-Vagant Women: Hope Leslie and the Captivity Romance.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 6.2 (1989): 3-16.

Clements, Victoria L. Dancing Discourses: Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction and Subject/Object Relations. Dissertation: George Washington U, 1998.

—. “‘A Powerful and Thrilling Voice’: The Significance of Crazy Bet.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 40-52.

Cohoon, Lorinda B. “‘A Just, a Useful Part’: Lydia Huntley Sigourney and Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Contributions to The Juvenile Miscellany and The Youth’s Companion.” Enterprising Youth: Social Values and Acculturation in Nineteenth-Century American Children’s Literature. Ed. Monika Elbert. New York: Routledge, 2008. 3-17.

Crosby, Shelby Lucille. Over the River and through the Woods: Miscegenation and the American Experiment. Dissertation: State U of New York, Buffalo, 2007.

Daly, Robert. “Reading Sedgwick Now: Empathy and Ethics in Early America.” Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries 2 (2010): 131-152.

Damon-Bach, Lucinda. “Catharine Maria Sedgwick Tours England: Private Letters, Public Account.” Transatlantic Women: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Great Britain. Eds. Beth L. Lueck, Brigitte Bailey, and Lucinda L. Damon-Bach.U of New Hampshire P, 2012. 21-48.

—. “The Joy of Untamed Spirits and Undiminished Strength”: Catharine Sedgwick’s and Susan Warner’s Revisionary Romances. Dissertation: State U of New York, Buffalo, 1995.

Damon-Bach, Lucinda and Victoria Clements, eds. Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003.

Davidson, Cathy N. Preface. A New-England Tale; or, Sketches of New-England Character and Manners. By Catharine Maria Sedgwick. New York: Oxford UP, 1995. vii-ix.

—. Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America. New York: Oxford UP, 1986.

Dean, Janet Elaine. Mediating Women: Gender and the Frontier in the American Imagination, 1804-1853. Dissertation: Columbia U, 1996.

Deng, Chiou-Rung. The Hazard of Sympathy, Race, and Gender in Antebellum American Women’s Writing. Dissertation: State U of New York, Buffalo, 2009.

—. “Sentimental Killing: Truth, Sympathy, and Translation in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” NTU Studies in Language and Literature 22 (2009): 133-168.

Derounian-Stodola, Kathryn Zabelle. “The Gendering of American Fiction: Susanna Rowson to Catharine Sedgwick.” Making America/Making American Literature. Eds. A. Robert Lee and W. M. Verhoeven. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1996.

Dewey, Mary E., ed. Life and Letters of Catharine M. Sedgwick. New York: Harper, 1871.

Doolen, Andy. “Blood, Republicanism, and the Return of George Washington: A Response to Shirley Samuels.” American Literary History 20.1-2 (2008): 76-82.

Dyer, Gary. “The Transatlantic Pocahontas.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 30.4 (2008 Dec): 301-322.

Elliott, Brian P. “Messengers of Justice and of Wrath'” The Captivity-Revenge Cycle in the American Frontier Romance. Dissertation: Ohio U, 2011.

Elmore, Jenifer Lynn Bobo. Sacred Unions: Catharine Sedgwick, Maria Edgeworth, and Domestic-Political Fiction. Dissertation: Florida State U, 2002.

Emerson, Amanda. “History, Memory, and the Echoes of Equivalence in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 24.1 (2007): 24-49.

Ferretti, Joan Varnum. “Religious Apostasy and Market Rebellion: The Early Republic’s Crises of Authority in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale; Or Sketches of New-England Character and Manners (1822).” Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries5 (2013): xii,xiii, 163-203.

Fetterley, Judith “‘My Sister! My Sister!’: The Rhetoric of Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 70.3 (1998): 491-516.

—. Introduction. “Cacoethes Scribendi.” Provisions: A Reader from 19th-Century American Women. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1985. 41-49.

Fick, Thomas H. “Catharine Sedgwick’s ‘Cacoethes Scribendi’: Romance in Real Life.” Studies in Short Fiction 27.4 (1990): 567-76.

Finger, Roland. “The Reassurance of Sororicide.” Pacific Coast Philology 40 (2005): 117-37.

Finn, Margaret L. Immanent Nature: Environment, Women, and Sacrifice in the Nature Writing of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, and Sarah Orne Jewett. Dissertation: Temple U, 2010.

Floyd, Janet. “Back into Memory Land? Quilts and the Problem of History.” Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 37.1 (2008): 38-56.

Ford, Douglas. “Inscribing the ‘Impartial Observer’ in Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 14.2 (1997): 81-92.

Forsa, Catherine Q. “A Model Heart: Public Displays of Emotion in Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale.” ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance 61.3 (2015): 411-39.

Foster, Edward Halsey. Catharine Maria Sedgwick. New York: Twayne, 1974.

Foster, Ellen Adrienne. C. M. Sedgwick’s “Patient Investigation” of America’s Past: An Intertextual Study of Hope Leslie. Dissertation: Duquesne U, 2005.

Gallchoir, Cliona. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the Irish National Tale.” Transatlantic Stowe: Harriet Beecher Stowe and European Culture. Ed. Denise Kohn, Sarah Meer and Emily B. Todd. Iowa City, IA: U of Iowa P, 2006. 24-45.

Garvey, T. Gregory. “Risking Reprisal: Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie and the Legitimation of Public Action by Women.” American Transcendental Quarterly 8.4 (1994): 287-98.

Gee, Karen Richardson. “Women, Wilderness, and Liberty in Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Studies in the Humanities 19.2 (1992): 161-70.

Gidez, Richard Banus. A Study of the Works of Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Dissertation: Ohio State University, 1958.

Giles, Jane. Catharine Maria Sedgwick: An American Literary Biography. Dissertation: City University of New York, 1984.

Gladden, Mendy Claire. Property and the Pursuit of Happiness: Lost Futures and Post-Revolutionary Literary Homes. Dissertation: U of Virginia, 2004.

Gossett, Suzanne and Barbara Ann Bardes. “Women and Political Power in the Republic: Two Early American Novels.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 2.2 (1985): 13-30.

Gould, Philip. “Catharine Sedgwick’s Cosmopolitan Nation.” New England Quarterly: A Historical Review of New England Life and Letters 78.2 (2005): 232-58.

—. “Catharine Sedgwick’s ‘Recital’ of the Pequot War.” American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 66.4 (1994): 641-62.

—. Covenant and Republic: Historical Romance and the Politics of Puritanism. NY: Cambridge UP, 1996.

Gussman, Deborah. “‘Equal to Either Fortune’: Sedgwick’s Married or Single? and Feminism.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives. Ed. Lucinda Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements. Boston: Northeastern UP, 2003. 252-267.

—. Introduction. Married or Single? by Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2015. 

. Remembering Plymouth Rock: The Making of Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Narratives of Colonial New England. Dissertation: Rutgers University, 1993. (Chapter on Hope Leslie and Cooper’s The Wept of Wish Ton Wish)

Hankins, Laurel V. “The Voice of Nature: Hope Leslie and Early American Romanticism.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 31.2 (2014): 160-82.

Harris, Susan. 19th-Century American Women’s Novels: Interpretive Strategies. New York: Cambridge UP, 1990.

Higonnet, Margaret R. “Comparative Reading: Catharine M. Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 15.1 (1998): 17-22.

Holly, Carol. “Nineteenth-Century Autobiographies of Affiliation: The Case of Catharine Sedgwick and Lucy Larcom.” American Autobiography: Retrospect and Prospect. Ed. Paul John Eakin. Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1991.

Homestead, Melissa J. “American Novelist Catharine Sedgwick Negotiates British Copyright, 1822–57.” Yearbook of English Studies 45 (2015): viii, 196-215.

—. “The Shape of Catharine Sedgwick’s Career.” The Cambridge History of American Women’s Literature. Ed. Dale M. Bauer. Cambridge UP, 2012. 185-203.

Insko, Jeffrey. “Anachronistic Imaginings: Hope Leslie‘s Challenge to Historicism.” American Literary History 16.2 (2004): 179-207.

Kalayjian, Patricia Larson. “Cooper and Sedgwick: Rivalry or Respect?” James Fenimore Cooper Society Miscellaney 4 (1993): 9-19.

—. Her “Classic Pen”: Critical Politics and the Reputation of Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Dissertation: Duke U, 1992.

Karafilis, Maria. “Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie: The Crisis between Ethical Political Action and US Literary Nationalism in the New Republic.” American Transcendental Quarterly 12.4 (1998): 327-44.

Kelley, Mary, ed. Introduction. Hope Leslie; or, Early Times in the Massachusetts. 1827. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 1987.

—. Introduction. The Power of Her Sympathy: The Autobiography and Journal of Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Boston: Mass. Historical Society: Distributed by Northeastern UP, 1993.

—. “Legacy Profile: Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867).” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 6.2 (1989): 43-50.

—. “Negotiating a Self: The Autobiography and Journals of Catharine Maria Sedgwick.” The New England Quarterly: A Historical Review of New England Life and Letters 66.3 (1993): 366-98.

—. Private Woman, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Oxford UP, 1984.

Kim, Jinkyung. “[The Representations of the Native Americans in the Works of Child, Cooper and Sedgwick].” Nineteenth Century Literature in English 9.1 (2005): 35-58. (In Korean; English summary)

Krumrey, Diane. “On the Frontier of Natural Language with the Eloquent Indians: Hobomok and Hope Leslie.” The Image of the American West in Literature, the Media, and Society. Eds. Will Wright and Steven Kaplan. Pueblo, CO: U of Southern Colorado, 1997.

LaMonaca, Maria. “‘She Could Make a Cake As Well As Books . . .’: Catharine Sedgwick, Anne Jameson, and the Construction of the Domestic Intellectual.” Women’s Writing: The Elizabethan to Victorian Period 2.3 (1995): 235-49.

Loeffelholz, Mary. “Who Killed Lucretia Davidson? Or, Poetry in the Domestic-Tutelary Complex.” Yale Journal of Criticism: Interpretation in the Humanities 10.2 (1997): 271-93.

Lubovich, Maglina. “‘Married or Single?’: Catharine Maria Sedgwick on Old Maids, Wives, and Marriage.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 25.1 (2008): 23-40.

Luciano, Dana. “Voicing Removal: Mourning (as) History in Hope Leslie.” Western Humanities Review 58.2 (2004): 48-67.

MacDonald, Linda Roberts. The Discarded Daughters of the American Revolution: Catharine Sedgwick, E.D.E.N. Southworth, and Augusta Evans Wilson. Dissertation: U of Colorado, 1993.

Madison, R. D. “Sedgwick’s Memorials: Hope Leslie and Colonial Historiography.” Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries 4 (2012): xiii, 1-9.

Matter-Seibel, Sabina. “Native Americans, Women, and the Culture of Nationalism in Lydia Maria Child and Catharine Maria Sedgwick.” Early America Re-Explored: New Readings in Colonial, Early National, and Antebellum Culture. Eds. Klaus H. Schmidt and Fritz Fleishman. New York: Peter Lang, 2000.

Merish, Lori. Sentimental Materialism: Gender, Commodity Culture, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature. [See especially Ch. 2, “Gender, Domesticity, and Consumption in the 1830s: Caroline Kirkland, Catharine Sedgwick, and the Feminization of American Consumerism.”] Durham: Duke UP, 2000.

Mills, Rose M. “Reading Hope Leslie via Wollstonecraft: A Pedagogy for Sedgwick’s Novel.” Journal of Kentucky Studies 24 (2007): 110-116.

Mitchell, Domhnall. “Acts of Intercourse: ‘Miscegenation’ in Three 19th Century American Novels.” American Studies in Scandinavia 27.2 (1995): 126-41.

Murray, Robin L. “Repulsed by Nature: Hope Leslie, Magawisca, and the ‘Advancement’ of Civilization.” Sycamore: A Journal of American Culture 1.4 (1997): 1; 25.

Nelson, Dana. “Sympathy as Strategy in Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” The Culture of Sentiment: Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in Nineteenth-Century America. Ed. Shirley Samuels. New York: Oxford UP, 1992.

Opfermann, Susanne. “Lydia Maria Child, James Fenimore Cooper, and Catharine Maria Sedgwick: A Dialogue on Race, Culture, and Gender.” Soft Canons: American Women Writers and Masculine Tradition. Ed. Karen Kilcup. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1999.

Papashvily, Helen Waite. All the Happy Endings. New York: Harper, 1956.

Pattee, F. L. The Feminine Fifties. New York, 1940.

Phelps, C. Deirdre. American Authorship and New York Publishing History, 1827-1842: The Market Experience of Catharine Maria Sedgwick and William Cullen Bryant. Dissertation: Boston U, 1993.

Pusch, Jeffrey Taylor. Moral Performances: Melodrama and Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Dissertation: U of Southern Mississippi, 2011.

Putnam, LuElla Lea. “Sometimes Sympathetic Friends: Cross-Cultural Relationships between Women in S. Alice Callahan’s Wynema and Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Arkansas Literary Review 1.1 (2011): 31-53.

Robbins, Sarah. “Periodizing Authorship, Characterizing Genre: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Benevolent Literacy Narratives.” American Literature: A Journal of Literary History, Criticism, and Bibliography 76.1 (2004): 1-29.

Ritter, Carla R. Insurrection behind the Veil: Religious Heterodoxy in Sedgwick, Child and Stowe. Dissertation: Temple U, 1999.

Ross, Cheri Louise Graves. Transforming Fictional Genres: Five Nineteenth-Century American Feminist Novelists. Dissertation: Purdue U, 1991.

—. “(Re)Writing the Frontier Romance: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” College Language Association Journal 39.3 (1996): 320-40.

Samuels, Shirley. Romances of the Republic: Women, the Family, and Violence in the Literature of the Early American Nation. [See especially Ch. 3, “The Family in the Novel: Cooper and the Domestic Revolution.”] New York: Oxford UP, 1996.

—. “Women, Blood, and Contract.” American Literary History 20.1-2 (2008): 57-75.

Saulsbury, Rebecca R. “Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867).” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Eds. Denise D. Knoght and Emmanuel S. Nelson. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1997.

Scheiber, Andrew J. “Mastery and Majesty: Subject, Object, and the Power of Authorship in Catharine Sedgwick’s ‘Cacoethes Scribendi.'” American Transcendental Quarterly 10.1 (1996): 41-58.

Schweitzer, Ivy. “Imaginative Conjunctions on the Imperial ‘Frontier’: Catharine Sedgwick Reads Mungo Park.” Feminist Interventions in Early American Studies. Ed. Mary C. Carruth. Tuscaloosa, AL: U of Alabama P, 2006. 126-43.

—. Perfecting Friendship: Politics and Affiliation in Early American Literature. Chapel Hill, NC: U of North Carolina P, 2006.

Shapiro, Joe. “The Providence of Class: Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Political Economy, and Sentimental Fiction in the 1830s.” American Literary History 27.2 (2015): 199-225.

Shields, Juliet. “Pedagogy in the Post-Colony: Documentary Didacticism and the ‘Irish Problem’.” Eighteenth-Century Novel 6-7 (2009): 465-493.

Simmons, Clare A. “Hope Leslie, Marmion, and the Displacement of Romance.” ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews 17.1 (2004): 20-25.

Singley, Carol J. “Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie: Radical Frontier Romance.” Desert, Garden, Margin, Range: Literature on the American Frontier. Ed. Eric Heyne. New York: Twayne, 1992.

Sohn, Jeonghee.”[Virtuous Citizenship and Class in Sedgwick’s The Poor Rich Man, and the Rich Poor Man].” Nineteenth Century Literature in English 14.2 (2010): 85-111. (In Korean; English summary)

Stadler, Gustavus. “Magawisca’s Body of Knowledge: Nation-Building in Hope Leslie.Yale Journal of Criticism: Interpretation in the Humanities 12.1 (1999): 41-56.

Steel, Jeffrey. “The Lost Lady in the World of Comus: Catherine Maria Sedgwick and Margaret Fuller Read Milton.” Transatlantic Women: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Great Britain. Eds. Beth L. Lueck, Brigitte Bailey, and Lucinda L. Damon-Bach. U of New Hampshire P, 2012. 175-187.

Steinberg, Stacy A. “‘Unexpected and Inconvenient Notice’: Domestic Entrapment and Servant Infidelity in The Coopers and Live and Let Live.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 15.1 (1998): 85-91.

Strand, Amy Dunham.”Interpositions: Hope Leslie, Women’s Petitions, and Historical Fiction in Jacksonian America.” Studies in American Fiction 32.2 (2004): 131-64.

Sweet, Nancy F. “Dissent and the Daughter in A New England Tale and Hobomok.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 22.2 (2005): 107-25.

Szabo, Liz. “‘Pleasure in an Illusion’: Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” The Image of the American West in Literature, the Media, and Society. Eds. Will Wright and Steven Kaplan. Pueblo, CO: U of Southern Colorado, 1997.

Tawil, Ezra F. “Domestic Frontier Romance, or, How the Sentimental Heroine Became White.” Novel: A Forum on Fiction 32.1 (1998): 99-124.

Templin, Mary. “‘Dedicated to Works of Beneficience’: Charity as Model for a Domesticated Economy in Antebellum Women’s Panic Fiction.” Our Sisters’ Keepers: Nineteenth-Century Benevolence Literature by American Women. Ed. Jill Bergman and Debra Bernardi. Tuscaloosa, AL: U of Alabama P, 2005. 80-104.

Tuthill, Maureen. “Land and the Narrative Site in Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” American Transcendental Quarterly 19.2 (2005): 95-113.

Van Dette, Emily. “‘It Should Be a Family Thing’: Family, Nation, and Republicanism in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and The Linwoods.” American Transcendental Quarterly 19.1 (2005): 51-74.

—. Family and Nation in Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction. Dissertation: Pennsylvania State U, 2004.

—. “‘A Whole, Perfect Thing’: Sibling Bonds and Anti-slavery Politics in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Dred.” American Transcendental Quarterly 22:2 (2008): 415-432.

Varnum, Joan Lorraine. Pledging Allegiance: Apostasy, Adventure, and the American Woman in the Early Fiction (1822-1835) of Catharine Maria Sedgwick. Dissertation: New York U, 2003.

Watson, David. “Under the Government of Sympathy: Sentimental History in Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie; Or, Early Time in the Massachusetts.” Journal of Literary Studies/Tydskrif vir Literatuurwetenskap 29.2 (2013): 6-23.

Watson, Marsha June. Intertextuality and Early American Women Writers. Dissertation: U of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 1997.

Welsh, Mary Michael. Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Her Position in the Literature and Thought of her Time up to 1860. Dissertation: Catholic U, 1937.

West, Lisa. “The Nature of ‘The Flourishing Village’ in America: Prospects in Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries 2 (2010): 103-129.

Zagarell, Sandra A. “Expanding ‘America’: Lydia Sigourney’s Sketch of Connecticut, Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie.” Redefining the Political Novel: American Women Writers, 1797-1901. Ed. Sharon M. Harris. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 1995. First published: Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 6, no. 2 (1987 Fall): 225-245.

List last updated July 2017.